INTERNATIONAL REPORTS

Response from Canada

On March 5, 2020, the first outbreak in a Canadian long-term care home was reported in the province of British Columbia, where a staff member at the Lynn Valley Care Centre in Vancouver had tested positive for COVID-19 (Source: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-how-the-coronavirus-took-north-vancouvers-lynn-valley-care-centre/). On March 8, a resident at the home became the first Canadian to die from COVID-19. The Public Health Agency of Canada have reported that, as of March 13, 2021, 12,337 out of 22,438 (55%) COVID-19 deaths in Canada were from these settings. According to the 2016 Census, 425,755 Canadians lived in long-term care or retirement homes as well as assisted living facilities. Therefore, the number of COVID-19 deaths in these settings would represent 2.90% of this population (Source: https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/surv-covid19-weekly-epi-update-20210129-eng.pdf).

Due to variation in reporting we are unable to determine whether the location of death was in a care home. It is important to note that, in Canada, many official sources have been reporting total counts of deaths in care homes, whether COVID-19 was determined to be a contributing or underlying cause of death or not. This may have inflated the estimates of the proportion of deaths due to COVID-19. Unfortunately, given the low rates of testing early in the pandemic, and the subsequent lack of post-mortem testing, some residents who died remain suspected rather than confirmed cases.

2.02.-Canada-20210729

Last updated: July 29th, 2021

    Family Involvement and Unpaid Caregiving in Long-Term Care Homes

    Last updated: July 8th, 2021

      CFHI-CPSI Pandemic preparedness and response in long-term care. Self-assessment (Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute)

      CFHI-CPSI Pandemic preparedness and response in long-term care. Self-assessment (Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute)

      To help support homes from the long-term care (LTC) and retirement home sector learn from each other  strengthen pandemic preparedness, the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute launched LTC+: Acting on Pandemic Learning Together. As part of the program, teams delivering healthcare to older adults in congregate settings complete a Self-Assessment Tool. This self-assessment (non-exhaustive and non-validated) is a tool to help long-term care and retirement homes assess pandemic preparedness, inform outbreak response planning, and prepare for future waves of Covid-19.

      The tool can help to identify strengths and areas for improvement to inform pandemic planning efforts ahead of future waves of Covid-19. It can be complementary to Covid-19-specific checklists that may be regionally or provincially available.


      CFHI-CPSI Pandemic preparedness and response in long-term care. Self-assessment. Ottawa, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute, 2021, 7 p.


       

      CFHI-CPSI Pandemic preparedness and response in long-term care. Self-assessment (Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute)

      Last updated: May 10th, 2021

        Reimagining care for older adults. Next steps in Covid-19 response in long-term care and retirement homes. What we heard (Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute)

        Reimagining care for older adults. Next steps in Covid-19 response in long-term care and retirement homes. What we heard (Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute)

        This report is based on more than 40 interviews with family partners in care, healthcare leaders and policy makers. It focuses on promising practices in six key areas that have the potential to reduce the risk of future Covid-19 outbreaks or mitigate their effects:

        • Preparation
        • Prevention
        • People in the workforce
        • Pandemic response and surge capacity
        • Planning for Covid-19 and non-Covid-19 care
        • The presence of family

        The report is intended to support those delivering healthcare to older adults in congregate settings – staff, managers, policy makers, family and caregiver partners and others who are all working hard to manage tough situations now, while also trying to look and plan ahead.


        Reimagining care for older adults. Next steps in Covid-19 response in long-term care and retirement homes. What we heard. Ottawa, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute, 2020, 38 p.


         

        Reimagining care for older adults. Next steps in Covid-19 response in long-term care and retirement homes. What we heard (Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute)

        Last updated: May 7th, 2021

          Identifying barriers, facilitators and recommendations to long-term care Covid-19 infection prevention and control preparedness and response (Canadian Foundation for Health Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute)

          Identifying barriers, facilitators and recommendations to long-term care Covid-19 infection prevention and control preparedness and response (Canadian Foundation for Health Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute)

          This research analyzes 25 interviews with long-term care and retirement homes stakeholders from across Canada, to:

          • identify barriers and facilitators to, as well as needs and recommendations for, Covid-19 preparedness in these settings;
          • map relevant tools and resources from the “IPAC+ Resource Library” that can be leveraged as support.

          Interviewees were asked to describe the factors that contributed to Covid-19 outbreaks, identify promising practices with the potential for short-term spread and scale, and provide suggestions on how to maintain essential non-Covid-19 care for older adults.


          The Knowledge Translation Program (Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital) Identifying barriers, facilitators and recommendations to long-term care Covid-19 infection prevention and control preparedness and response. Ottawa, Canadian Foundation for Health Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute, 2021, 16 p.


           

          Identifying barriers, facilitators and recommendations to long-term care Covid-19 infection prevention and control preparedness and response (Canadian Foundation for Health Improvement and Canadian Patient Safety Institute)

          Last updated: May 6th, 2021

            Safely re-entering long-term care homes during Covid-19: A resource for essential care partners (Healthcare Excellence Canada)

            Safely re-entering long-term care homes during Covid-19: A resource for essential care partners (Healthcare Excellence Canada)

            This resource was created by essential care partners, for essential care partners who have loved ones in long-term care homes during Covid-19.

            An essential care partner is a person who provides physical, psychological and emotional support, as deemed important by the patient or resident. This care can include support in decision making, care coordination and continuity of care. Essential care partners can include family members, close friends or other caregivers and are identified by the patient or resident or substitute decision maker.

            Essential care partners are different to general visitors; they have a vital role in a resident’s care plan, including during the pandemic.

            This resource provides foundational information for those who have loved ones in long-term care during the pandemic. This includes:

            • What are the roles and responsibilities of essential care partners?
            • How to navigate caregiving together
            • The current state of LTC homes
            • The current provincial and territorial directives

            This resource builds on the “LTC+ Acting on Pandemic Learning Together program”. It has been shared with more than 1,500 long-term care and retirement homes participating in the program.


            Safely re-entering long-term care homes during Covid-19: A resource for essential care partners. Ottawa, Healthcare Excellence Canada, 2021, 16 p.


             

            Safely re-entering long-term care homes during Covid-19: A resource for essential care partners (Healthcare Excellence Canada)

            Last updated: May 5th, 2021

              Covid-19 Vaccine preparedness resources for long-term care and retirement homes (Healthcare Excellence Canada)

              Covid-19 Vaccine preparedness resources for long-term care and retirement homes (Healthcare Excellence Canada)

              These resources have been curated with immunization experts from across the country, including Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), Solutions for Kids in Pain and #SeePainMoreClearly. These resources aim to help LTC and retirement homes plan and rollout COVID-19 vaccines to residents, staff and essential care partners,and support informed choices about the COVID-19 vaccine.

              There are four main sections:

              • Section 1: Planning guidance for immunization clinics
              • Section 2: Characteristics, handling and administration of Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines
              • Section 3: Promoting COVID-19 vaccine uptake
              • Section 4: Improve the vaccine experience by reducing pain, anxiety and/or needle fears

              Covid-19 Vaccine preparedness resources for long-term care and retirement homes. Ottawa, Healthcare Excellence Canada, 2021, online.


               

              Covid-19 Vaccine preparedness resources for long-term care and retirement homes (Healthcare Excellence Canada)

              Last updated: May 5th, 2021

              Dated:  20210319

              Provinces in Canada have jurisdiction over the health care sector but are governed under the Canada Health Act, which establishes “criteria and conditions related to insured health services and extended health care services that the provinces and territories must fulfill to receive the full federal cash contribution under the Canada Health Transfer”. LTC facilities are not included under the Canada Health Act and are solely under the jurisdiction of the 5 regional health authorities (Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/health-care-system/canada-health-care-system-medicare/canada-health-act.html).

              1.04.-Canada-20210319

              Last updated: March 22nd, 2021

              Dated:  20210319

              Research found that unpaid carers were worried about the impact on their relatives with dementia and reported reduced or altered formal care support, as well as anxiety and feelings of burnout. (Source: https://ltccovid.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Lorenz_Comas_COVID_impact_unpaidcarers_preprint.pdf)

              2.06.-Canada-20210319

              Last updated: March 22nd, 2021

              Dated:  20210319

              In Ontario, Canada, social outdoor visits were generally encouraged. From September 2020, family carers providing essential caregiving activities could enter the homes. As cases increase again, some areas limited social visits but enable family carers to continue to see their relatives. Family carers entering homes must get regular COVID-19 (bi-weekly/weekly in areas with high transmission) to be allowed to enter. In Quebec, the government stated in November 2020 that care homes could not make the provision of a negative test a requirement for visitors. (Source: https://ltccovid.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Care-home-visiting-policies-international-report-19-January-2021-1.pdf)

              3.07.03.-Canada-20210319

              Last updated: March 22nd, 2021