Research Projects on COVID-19 and Long-Term Care

This page gathers information about completed or ongoing research projects on COVID-19 and long-term care. If you would like to to contribute information about your project, please complete our online submission form.

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Blended Gaming COVID-19 Training System (BGCTS) with WHO guidelines for staff in residential care homes: A cluster randomised controlled trialOngoing

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Contact: Prof. Angela Y. M. Leung https://sn.polyu.edu.hk/whocc/en/aboutus.html

Host institution: School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Project team: Angela Y. M. Leung, Alex Molasiotis, Simon Lam, Justina Liu, Eliza Wong, Doris YP Leung, Mimi Tse

Funding information: Health and Medical Research Fund, (HMRF), Food and Health Bureau, The government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong), China

Project summary:

Objective: To assess the effect of the Blended Gaming COVID-19 Training System (BGCTS) on infection control practices, compliance rates and knowledge of standard precautions among all staff in residential care homes (RCHs). Design: A 2-arm single-blinded cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting: Twenty RCHs (out of the 70 RCHs in the established network). Participants: 188 staff (from 20 RCHs) will be randomized to the intervention group (IG) or the control group (CG) according to their RCHs. Intervention: The intervention is a blended mode of training (e-health mode blended with face-to-face sessions) and the contents are derived from ‘The COVID-19 Risk Communication Package For Healthcare Facilities developed by the World Health Organization. E-health mode refers to a 120-minute web-based training system covering 8 topics in 2 weeks. Short-clip videos and games are used. Two face-to-face 30-minute interactive sessions will be arranged for clarifying concepts. Main outcome measures: Primary outcome: compliance rate of hand hygiene and infection control practices (by non-participatory observations with a checklist on infection control practices). Observation will be made of the staff in the IG and CG when they are working in the facilities. Secondary outcomes: Knowledge and attitudes towards infection control (KAIC) and Self-reported Infection Control Practice (SICP) Expected outcomes: BGCTS will improve staff’s performance at infection control practices. The BGCTS is the first of this kind training, addressing the diverse health literacy levels of staff and helping RCH staff to comply with WHO infection control guidelines. RCHs can adopt BGCTS in staff development training in the future.

Outputs:

BGCTS will improve staff’s performance at infection control practices. The BGCTS is the first of this kind training, addressing the diverse health literacy levels of staff and helping RCH staff to comply with WHO infection control guidelines. RCHs can adopt BGCTS in staff development training in the future.

Project website:

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

BrainLive: Connecting Families Living with Dementia in Pandemic Situations and BeyondOngoing

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Contact: Dr Gloria HY Wong https://www.socialwork.hku.hk/gloriawong/

Host institution: The University of Hong Kong

Project team: Principal Investigator: Dr Gloria HY Wong Co-investigators: Professor Aimee Spector, Dr Ruizhi Dai, Professor Doris SF Yu, Dr Anthony PH Kong, Dr Hao Luo, Professor Martin Knapp, Professor Terry YS Lum Project manager: Mr. Jacky CP Choy

Funding information: Simon K.Y. Lee Foundation, a Hong Kong based philanthropic foundation with a mission to improve the well-being of the elderly and enhance the access to quality education by underprivileged children.

Project summary:

BrainLive, funded the Simon K.Y. Lee Foundation, is a 2-year project that mainly aims to develop a best practice model of barrier-free online dementia community support service using information and communications technology (ICT) and productive ageing to deliver intervention and care. In 2 years, we will develop a tested model that is effective and equitable, with good economic value for society, and ready to be widely implemented in various community service settings. The project targets to test the feasibility, acceptability and sustainability of an online community-based dementia service model consisting of a package of evidence-based social care and intervention services for families living with dementia delivered via ICT tools with trained young-old volunteers support, with the following objectives: 1) ensure access to evidence-based intervention and care under infection control situations; 2) prepare families living with dementia and service providers for future remote service development by enhancing their ICT literacy in the post-pandemic era; 3) build capacity of the community to care for families living with dementia by developing young-old volunteers for remote dementia service; 4) promote innovations by NGOs to explore full potentials of ICT-enriched service for continued service, including involvement of carers in the long-term; and 5) identify using service data the best combination of the standard service package and other infrastructure and support for an optimised model to recommend in Hong Kong.

Outputs:

Expected Sep 2022

Project website:

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Controlling the spread of COVID-19 in care homes: health and social care partnerships LanarkshireOngoing

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Contact: Le Khanh Ngan Nguyen https://pureportal.strath.ac.uk/en/persons/le-khanh-ngan-nguyen/publications/

Host institution: University of Strathclyde

Project team: Strathclyde University: Le Khanh Ngan Nguyen, Dr Itamar Megiddo, Professor Susan Howick, Gillian Hopkins Anderson, Dr Robert Van Der Meer HSCP Lanarkshire: Dennis McLafferty Public Health Medicine - NHS Lanarkshire: Dr. Sahaya Josephine Pravinkumar

Funding information: SRSS - University REA and DHSC

Project summary:

Background

Scottish care homes are vulnerable to the widespread transmission of COVID-19 and poor outcomes. The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately high fatality rates among older adults, particularly those with comorbidities.

Care homes provide health and care services for approximately 40,000 residents, of which the majority are elders with complex medical and care needs.

COVID-19 has had a significant impact on the care homes within Lanarkshire, similar to other local authorities. While there is a plethora of research focusing on the spread of COVID-19 in the general population, research on the unique transmission dynamics and interventions for COVID-19 in care homes is negligible.

Infection control interventions in care homes need to be both effective in containing the spread of COVID-19 and also feasible to implement in this setting which has a dual nature: a healthcare institution and a home.

Research Aims

This research aim to:

  • evaluate the effectiveness of a range of interventions strategies in controlling COVID-19 in care homes
  • investigate the impact of staff sharing between care homes in Lanarkshire on the inter-facility transmission of COVID-19
  • answer emerging questions for care home stakeholders from Lanarkshire

Outputs:

Analysis 1: An evaluation of interventions implemented in care homes early on and an evaluation of additional interventions on top of these, including testing of staff and testing of residents – Evaluating intervention strategies in controlling coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spread in care homes: An agent-based model – PubMed (nih.gov)

Analysis 2: An evaluation of visiting policy in care homes as well as cohorting of staff and residents within care home – paper under review

Analysis 3: Impacts of various vaccination coverages on the spread of Covid-19 and deaths in care homes, report available here.

Project website:https://www.strath.ac.uk/research/subjects/managementscience/healthsystems/controllingthespreadofcovid-19incarehomes/

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Report-3_Care-homes_Vaccination_Strathclyde.pdf (1.9 MB)

Development and evaluation of a training package to support the remote assessment and management of people with movement impairment and disability (UK)Ongoing

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Contact: Jennifer Freeman

Host institution: University of Plymouth

Project team: Jennifer Freeman

Funding information: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)

Project summary:

The need for rehabilitation for COVID-19 patients is escalating. The team will develop and evaluate a training package for NHS/social care staff to support them during remote assessment and management of COVID-19 patients requiring rehabilitation. This is challenging to do remotely, as balance and mobility cannot be easily assessed. The staff will be provided with practical guidance and training to increase their skills.

Outputs:

Project website:https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/research/centre-for-health-technology/remote-assessment-and-management-of-people-with-movement-impairment-and-disability

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

EU-COGER: Pan-European Study on Functional and Medical Recovery and Geriatric Rehabilitation Services of Post-COVID-19 PatientOngoing

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Contact: Miriam Haaksma

Host institution: Leiden University Medical Center

Project team: Monique Caljouw PhD, Adam Gordon, MBChB PhD, Stefan Grund MD MaHM, Miriam Haaksma PhD, Jos Schols MD PhD, Lisa van Tol MSc, Wilco P Achterberg MD PhD, COGER-Study Subgroup of the EuGMS-SIG on GR

Funding information:

Project summary:

The COGER study is collecting data to gain insight into the course of functional and medical recovery in older people affected by COVID-19 participating in rehabilitation across Europe.
The COGER study, designed by members of the Special Interest Group for Geriatric Rehabilitation of the European Geriatric Medical Society (EuGMS), study aims to:
1. Explore the course of activities of daily living (ADL) recovery and influencing factors
2. Describe other outcomes after geriatric rehabilitation in post-COVID-19 patients
3. Describe geriatric rehabilitation services provided to post COVID-19 patients across Europe.

The study has recruited over 700 patients between September 1, 2020 and November 1, 2021.

 

 

Outputs:

 

  • Insight into recovery of post-COVID patients during and after admission to geriatric rehabilitation. Functioning and quality of life will be our main outcomes.
  • Insight into the contend of COVID rehabilitation care in various European countries: which treatments are given and which professionals are involved? What works, and what does not?

In December 2021 a factsheet with preliminary data was published. Please see the link below for the factsheet:

https://www.lumc.nl/sub/9600/att/EU-COGER_update_dec_factsheet

Project website:https://www.lumc.nl/org/unc-zh/English/Research/EU_COGER_ENGLISHpage/

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Grund-et-al.-EU-COGER-study-protocol.pdf (317.2 KB)

Grund-et-al-COVID-rehabilitation-paradox.pdf (107.2 KB)

Evaluating and replicating local accountability platforms for residential care homes and social care services in Latin America (Argentina)Ongoing

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Contact: Peter Lloyd-Sherlock https://people.uea.ac.uk/p_lloyd-sherlock

Host institution: University of East Anglia

Project team: Lucas Sempe (UEA, UK), Nelida Redondo (Fundación SIDOM, Argentina), Magdalena Saieg (Fundación Navarro Viola, Argentina), Silvia Gascón (Red Mayor La Plata, Argentina), Lisandro Mariño (Camara de Hogares y Centros de Día de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina)

Funding information: Healthy Longevity Global Grand Challenge (UKRI).

Project summary:

Developing countries already contain large numbers of older people with social care needs, leading to a rapid growth in private provision, including residential services. Many operate on an informal, entirely unregulated basis. We have developed an online platform for sharing information about the quality of services in care homes for the city of La Plata, Argentina. This responded to concerns about poor service quality, an absence of public information and the limited capacity of official local regulators. The site, launched in 2019, consists of a simple interactive information-sharing platform. The site provides updated information about care homes and a set of service quality principles, developed in partnership with care home directors. It enables service users to provide feedback about providers. This feedback is not directly published on the site: instead, complaints are investigated and providers removed from the site if they are confirmed. The site also provides general information for service users to support the selection and assessment of social care services, and (more recently) the status of the COVID-19 pandemic in local care homes. Our project will evaluate the La Plata intervention, along with new related projects by other organisations in Argentina. We will assess the feasibility and potential benefits of scaling up over the next three years.

Outputs:

When are 2021

Project website:http://www.redmayorlaplata.com/

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Evidence-based supported digital intervention for improving wellbeing and health of people living in care homes WHELD during COVID-19 (UK)Ongoing

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Contact: Clive Ballard

Host institution: University of Exeter and King’s College London

Project team: Clive Ballard

Funding information: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) COV0094)

Project summary:

The WHELD well-being training intervention for care homes has shown benefits in two clinical trials by improving quality of life, mental health and reduced use of sedatives, and has been developed for virtual supervision. It has now been adapted to the COVID-19 context and evaluated in a RTC; an “implementation ready” programme will then be rolled out for care homes nation-wide.

Outputs:

Project website:https://www.nihr.ac.uk/news/new-research-to-personalise-care-for-people-with-dementia-in-care-homes-during-covid-19-pandemic/25812

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Impact of the Dementia Isolation Toolkit on Effective, Safe and Compassionate Isolation of Residents, and the Moral Distress amongst Staff in Long Term CareOngoing

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Contact: Andrea Iaboni https://www.uhnresearch.ca/researcher/andrea-iaboni

Host institution: Toronto Rehab, University Health Network

Project team: Andrea Iaboni, Alisa Grigorovich, Josephine McMurray, Arlene Astell, Alastair Flint, Kristina Kokorelias, Hannah Quirt, Kevin Rodriguez, Mario Tsokas

Funding information: This project was funded by the following: CIHR Institute of Infection and Immunity CIHR Institute of Aging Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation

Project summary:

The Dementia Isolation Toolkit was developed to provide evidence-informed guidance to support infection prevention and control measures that are consistent with person-centered care within long term care homes (LTCHs) during the pandemic. This project is a four-phase mixed-methods, research study evaluating the impact of the DIT intervention on outcomes related to 1) achieving safe, effective, and compassionate isolation of residents and 2) levels of moral distress amongst LTCH staff in three LTCHs situated in rural and city settings. The effectiveness of the DIT and the processes developed for its implementation will also be explored through developmental evaluation. Our approach includes multiple rapid quantitative (e.g., administrative/clinical surveys) and qualitative (e.g., interviews) analyses with up to 130 LTCH staff and family caregiver participants. We will directly engage these same knowledge users in the implementation process as part of the developmental evaluation, to increase the potential impact of the DIT intervention.

Outputs:

The research will be completed by December 2021 and expected outputs are:

  • The development of evidence-informed implementation approaches and materials for wide-spread distribution through our website.
  • We will publish articles in open-access journals relevant to long-term care and implementation science and share our findings on our website, on social media and through conference presentations.

Project website:https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/what-we-do/enhance-capacity-and-capability/ltc-acting-on-pandemic-learning-together/implementation-science-teams

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Implementation and evaluation of a mortality-risk prognostication tool (RESPECT-LTC) to enhance goals of care discussion in long-term care homesOngoing

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Contact: Amy Hsu https://bruyere.uniweb.network/members/84/profile

Host institution: Bruyere Research Institute

Project team: Amy Hsu, Justin Presseau, Benoit Robert, Douglas Manuel, Peter Tanuseputro, Melissa Donskov, Kednapa Thavorn, Zsofia Orosz, Celeste Fung, Amit Arya, Claudia Hampel, Dawn Stacey, Aleksandra Grzeszczuk, Andre Carrington, Kanwal Abdul Hai, Lysanne Lessard

Funding information: This project was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Project summary:

Palliative care is commonly misunderstood as only being relevant for people who are actively dying and in the final weeks or days of life. However, the relief of suffering through the provision of holistic and compassionate care is an essential component of care for all patients with a life-threatening illness. Among newly-admitted residents to long-term care (LTC) homes, where median life expectancy is just 18 months, most receiving care in this setting have limited life expectancy and can benefit from palliative care.

In this project, we will adopt an implementation science approach to evaluate the use of the Risk Evaluation for Support: Predictions for Elder-life in the Community Tool in LTC (RESPECT–LTC) to support their ongoing efforts to embed palliative approaches to care in their processes and culture. RESPECT–LTC is a mortality-risk communication tool that accurately predicts an older person’s six-month mortality risk as well as life expectancy to inform decision-making regarding the initiation of palliative and end-of-life care.

Outputs:

The research will be completed by December 2021 and expected outputs are:

  • Qualitative evidence on the acceptability to the use prognostic tools to aid decision-making around palliative care needs in long-term care
  • Identified barriers to the implementation of prognostic tools to support goals of care discussions within long-term care
  • The number of residents in long-term care homes who had: (a) a risk assessment performed using RESPECT–LTC (out of all the residents at each home); (b) a care conference or goals of care conversation in which RESPECT–LTC results were discussed, and the care decisions that precipitated from the discussion (e.g., on hospital transfers, resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, and preferred location of death); and (c) received palliative care over a six-month period following the implementation of RESPECT–LTC.
  • Healthcare outcomes associated with the use of RESPECT–LTC, such as a reduction in potentially burdensome transitions (i.e., frequent or unnecessary transfers to the emergency room and hospital), aggressive care at the end of life (e.g., intensive care unit [ICU] admissions, resuscitation, mechanical ventilation), health care cost, or misalignment between expressed preference for and recorded location of death among residents who died within one year of our implementation.
  • A set of recommended clinical pathways based on prognostic information and risk groups generated from RESPECT–LTC to support equitable access to care for residents near the end of life.

Project website:https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/what-we-do/enhance-capacity-and-capability/ltc-acting-on-pandemic-learning-together/implementation-science-teams;%20https://www.projectbiglife.ca/elder-life-calculator

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Improving prescribing of medications at EOL in LTC homes during COVID-19Ongoing

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Contact: Peter Tanuseputro http://www.ohri.ca/profile/ptanuseputro

Host institution: Bruyere Research Institute

Project team: Peter Tanuseputro, Amy Hsu, Sarina Isenberg, Aynharan Sinnarajah, Jessica Simon, Justin Presseau, Hsie Seow, Daniel Kobewka, Tara Gomes, Breffni Hannon, Vivian Ewa, James Downar, Jenny Lau, Stafford Dean, Hugh Boyd, Camille Munro, Chandra Vig, Patrick Quail, Michelle Grinman, Navjot Virk, Rachel Boissonneault, Denyse Lynch, Amit Arya, Markus Schafer, Aleksandra Grzeszczuk, Melissa Brouwers, Colleen Webber, Luke Turcotte, Michelle Howard, Colleen Maxwell.

Funding information: This project was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Project summary:

Knowledge users have identified a need to improve palliative care in long-term care (LTC) homes in Ontario and Alberta, and investigators in these provinces have access to data to conduct rapid implementation research. Our 3 main objectives are: 1. Data measurement to detect variations in end-of-life medication prescribing (proxy to palliative care delivery) before and during COVID-19; 2. Mixed methods evaluation to understand the barriers/facilitators of end-of-life prescribing in LTC; and 3. Intervention to support homes in both provinces, focusing on those most challenged to provide end-of-life care during COVID-19. For the quantitative component, we will use data on LTC homes in Ontario and Alberta held at Institute for Clinical and Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and Alberta Health Services (AHS). For the qualitative component, we will reach out to LTC homes identified as being top/bottom prescribers and interview staff, healthcare providers, and resident caregivers at these homes to gain a deeper understanding of the quantitative findings.

Outputs:

Given delays with data extraction in Alberta and qualitative recruitment challenges, we have extended our timeline of project completion to December 2022.

We plan to publish at least one paper for each of the project objectives:

  • A quantitative descriptive manuscript on the prescribing patterns of end-of-life medications for LTC residents pre-COVID, and examine how they have changed during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • A quantitative manuscript evaluating the additional impact of COVID-19 outbreak status on end-of-life prescribing in LTC
  • A quantitative manuscript exploring variations in prescribing during COVID-19 across LTC home characteristics, prescriber characteristics, and resident characteristics
  • A qualitative manuscript outlining insights into end-of-life prescribing and care in LTC pre-COVID
  • A qualitative manuscript informed by our quantitative findings outlining insights into end-of-life prescribing and care in the top and bottom prescribing homes during COVID-19

We also plan to communicate our findings to our partners at Ontario Palliative Care Network (OPCN) and collaborate to develop educational resources for LTC homes that may have more challenges with providing end-of-life care during COVID-19 and beyond.

Project website:https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/what-we-do/enhance-capacity-and-capability/ltc-acting-on-pandemic-learning-together/implementation-science-teams

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

MedSafer- Optimizing Prescribing for Pandemic PreparednessOngoing

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Contact: Emily McDonald https://www.mcgill.ca/internalmed/dr-emily-mcdonald

Host institution: Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre

Project team: Emily McDonald, Todd Lee, Chris Brockington, James Downar, Marnie Wilson, Adam Groening, Emilie Bortolussi-Courval, Robyn Tamblyn, Allen Huang, Babak Rashidi, Peter Wu, Sydney Ross, Han Ting Wang, Lisa McCarthy, Barbara Farrell, Justin Turner, Kiran Battu, Sandra Porter, John Yip, Ted Cohen, Jonathan Sachs, Marie-France Forget, Anna Slawski, Cindy Garcia, Louise Papillon-Ferland

Funding information: This project was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Project summary:

This study is a partnership between MedSafer, Point Click Care (PCC) and two Ontario long term care homes (Hillel Lodge in Ottawa and Kensington Gardens in Toronto). Providing comprehensive medication management is critical during the pandemic to optimize the care received by older adults, who are at high risk of COVID-19 complications. We previously integrated MedSafer, a software for deprescribing, into the PCC electronic medical record. We will be piloting the integration of the software into the workflow of two long term care homes during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We aim to test the feasibility and user experience of providing electronic decision support for medication management, in order to improve care during and beyond COVID-19. This process is expected to decrease harmful or unnecessary medications, improve staff safety and efficiency and lead to better outcomes for residents.

Outputs:

The research will be completed by January 2022 and expected outputs are:

  1. Provide medication management reports to long term care homes during the pandemic
  2. Test feasibility of providing medication management during the pandemic
  3. Test MedSafer integration in Point Click Care
  4. Improve the user experience with MedSafer integrated in Point Click Care
  5. Increase deprescribing during the pandemic for vulnerable populations in long term care
  6. Decrease unnecessary time spent on dispensing and monitoring of potentially inappropriate medications or medications of little added value (improve staff efficiency and maximize safety during the pandemic)
  7. Improve outcomes for residents of long-term care homes during the pandemic and for the future

Project website:https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/what-we-do/enhance-capacity-and-capability/ltc-acting-on-pandemic-learning-together/implementation-science-teams

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Nurse Practitioner Led Implementation of Health Workforce Recommendations In Long-Term Care Homes During a PandemicOngoing

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Contact: Katherine McGilton https://www.uhnresearch.ca/researcher/katherine-mcgilton

Host institution: KITE - Toronto Rehabilitation Institute - University Health Network

Project team: Katherine McGilton, Jennifer Bethell, Souraya Sidani, Veronique Boscart, Astrid Escrig Pinol, Andrea Iaboni, Shirin Vellani, Colleen Maxwell, Michelle Acorn, Claudia Mariano, Margaret Keatings, Corinne Pollard, Carrie Heer

Funding information: This project was funded by the following: CIHR Institute of Health Services and Policy Research CIHR Institute of Infection and Immunity Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation

Project summary:

This study is a twophase adaptation and implementation project of evidence-based health workforce interventions developed by our team to support health and wellbeing of staff and residents in two Long-Term Care Homes (LTCHs) in Ontario during the COVID-19 pandemic. The implementation of workforce interventions will be led by Nurse Practitioners (NPs). NPs are ideally placed to successfully implement and sustain the recommendations due to their dual clinical and leadership roles, as revealed by the findings of our previous qualitative study involving 14 NPs throughout Ontario. In phase 1 the interventions will be selected and adapted to the context; staff needs and staff characteristics within the 2 LTCHs. Phase 2 involves an effectiveness-implementation hybrid design which will assess adaptation and preliminary efficacy of the implementation of recommendations selected in Phase 1. The expected outcome is a reduction in staff moral distress following the implementation of the intervention.

Outputs:

The research will be completed by December 2021 and expected outputs are:

  • An editorial
  • An academic paper
  • A report to the funding agency

Project website:https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/what-we-do/enhance-capacity-and-capability/ltc-acting-on-pandemic-learning-together/implementation-science-teams

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Presence of Family: (re)Integrating Family CaregiversOngoing

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Contact: James Conklin https://bruyere.uniweb.network/members/46/profile

Host institution: Bruyere Research Institute

Project team: James Conklin, Anita Kothari, Melissa Donskov, Doug Archibald, Sophie Orosz, Amy Hsu, Jennifer Cornell, Lisa Raffoul, Lisa Salapatek, Heidi Sveistrup, Michelle Fleming, Jacobi Elliott, Nancy Hall

Funding information: This project was funded by the following: CIHR Institute of Health Services and Policy Research CIHR Institute of Gender and Health Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation

Project summary:

The “Presence of Family: (Re)Integrating Essential Care Partners in Ontario’s LTC Homes” project will help to develop and disseminate an intervention to allow family members (who are chosen by the resident and who provide them with physical/psycho-social care) to have safe access to the LTC home. We will work with three Ontario LTC homes to implement an intervention that combines training with a commitment to follow safety protocols and use ID badges, and facilitates greater access for essential care partners to the home. We will use developmental evaluation, a rapid scoping review, an economic analysis of the value of the care provided by family members, and a mixed methods outcome evaluation. To spread the learning from this work, we will convene an Advisory Board that includes members from participating LTC homes, family members, and other stakeholders.

Outputs:

The research will be completed by December 2021 and expected outputs are:

  1. An understanding of how do residents, essential care partners, and healthcare providers experience the implementation of the intervention in 3 participating LTC homes, including:
  • Identification of factors that facilitate or impede implementation.
  • Determination if experiences differentiated by sex, gender or other aspects of diversity.
  • Identification of factors related to sex, gender or other aspects of diversity.
  1. Identification of outcomes and effects that can be attributed to the intervention in the three homes, and inferences drawn from the evidence to explain these outcomes and impacts.
  2. Identification of features (processes, tools, training, supports) of an effective implementation process for the intervention that could be scaled/spread to other Ontario and Canadian LTC homes, including any special consideration that needs to be drawn to gender roles, gender identity, gender relations and institutional gender/diversity elements that influence implementation.
  3. A set of final outputs to support the scale and spread of the intervention, including:
  • A “business case” based on the results of the economic analysis
  • An Essential Care Partner Implementation Guide that presents an optimized version of the processes used to implement the intervention, with supporting tools available through one of our partner’s websites
  • A minimum of three webinars sharing learnings and allowing participants to action plan and form relationships
  • Publications and presentations made through available and relevant academic channels

Project website:https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/what-we-do/enhance-capacity-and-capability/ltc-acting-on-pandemic-learning-together/implementation-science-teams

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Préserver le lien des résidents en ESLD atteints de troubles cognitifs avec leurs proches en contexte de pandémie: évaluation de la mise en œuvre et des effets d’interventions virtuelles et en personnesOngoing

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Contact: Marie-Soleil Hardy https://www.fsi.ulaval.ca/notre-faculte/repertoire-du-personnel-enseignant-et-administratif/marie-soleil-hardy

Host institution: Universite Laval

Project team: Marie-Soleil Hardy, Philippe Voyer, Marie-Pierre Gagnon, Clémence Dallaire, Marai Cecilia Gallani, Vincent Couture, André Côté, Maude Laberge, Bernadette Dallaire, Éric Gagnon, Machelle Wilchesky.

Funding information: This project was funded by the following: • CIHR Institute of Health Services and Policy Research • CIHR Institute of Aging • CIHR Institute of Gender and Health

Project summary:

The goal of our project is to evaluate the implementation process, the viability and the acceptability of interventions aimed at favouring the presence of relatives (in person or virtually) in 5 LTC’s in Quebec City and in a rural area. We chose patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias as population. We want to assess the characteristics of the LTC’s, facilitating factors and barriers to the implementation of interventions, and the acceptability of the interventions to care staff, family members and the elderly patients. In addition, we will look at the results in the elderly and their relatives. Finally, a cost effectiveness study will be carried out. An evaluative research design is preferred in order to assess the conditions of implementation and document the preliminary effects of the interventions. A multiple case study will be carried out.

Outputs:

The research will be completed by December 2021 and expected outputs are:

  • To identify factors influencing the implementation, viability and acceptability of interventions aimed at favouring the presence of relatives;
  • To show the short-term effects on residents, their relatives and related costs;
  • To offer humane, adapted and safe care to a fragile clientele at high risk of decompensation and mortality;
  • Recognizing family and friends is essential to the quality of life of residents.

Project website:https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/what-we-do/enhance-capacity-and-capability/ltc-acting-on-pandemic-learning-together/implementation-science-teams

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS

Improved Testing for COVID-19 in Skilled Nursing Facilities: IMPACT-CComplete

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Contact: Sarah Berry, Vincent Mor https://impactcollaboratory.org/improved-testing-for-covid-19-in-skilled-nursing-facilities-impact-c/

Host institution: IMPACT Collaboratory Brown University School of Public Health, Center for Gerontology and Healthcare Research Marcus Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife

Project team: Sarah Berry (Co-PI, Hebrew SeniorLife), Vincent Mor (Co-PI, Brown University School of Public Health), David Gifford (American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living), Jill Harrison (Brown University School of Public Health), Michael Mina (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), Douglas Fridsma (Inicio Health), Ed Davidson, (Insight Therapeutics), Stefan Gravenstein (Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School), Jonathan Jackson (Massachusetts General Hospital), Kimberly Johnson (Duke University School of Medicine), Rosa Baier (Brown University School of Public Health), Ana Montoya (University of Michigan Medical School), David Grabowski (Harvard Medical School), Cyrus Kosar (Brown University School of Public Health), Keith Goldfeld (New York University School of Medicine), Jasmine Travers (New York University School of Nursing), Maricruz Rivera-Hernandez (Brown University School of Public Health), Shekinah Fashaw (Brown University School of Public Health), Jeff Hiris (Brown University School of Public Health), Susan Mitchell (Hebrew SeniorLife), Elizabeth White (Brown University School of Public Health)

Funding information: National Institute on Aging, IMPACT Collaboratory supplement, 3U54AG063546-02S2

Project summary:

IMPACT-COVID-19 (IMPACT-C) has established an infrastructure to develop and evaluate SARS-CoV-2 vaccination strategies among diverse skilled nursing facility (SNF) residents and staff. These efforts have included leveraging the NIA IMPACT Collaboratory’s Data Sharing Collaborative that includes 12 national companies with >1,000 SNFs. We have used this data to evaluate disparities in SARS-CoV-2 testing practices for SNF staff, to inform future policies on the impact of shift and race on testing practices (manuscript in progress). We have additionally completed a cluster RCT of 137 SNFs to compare the effect of a multi-component COVID-19 vaccine campaign versus usual care on the number of staff that complete COVID-19 vaccinations during the federal Pharmacy Partnership Program in the US (manuscript in press). Thus, IMPACT-C is well-poised to inform future vaccination strategies across SNFs aimed at equitable uptake for residents and staff.

Outputs:

Starting early 2021

Project website:https://impactcollaboratory.org/improved-testing-for-covid-19-in-skilled-nursing-facilities-impact-c/

PUBLICATIONS & OTHER OUTPUTS